Can You Get Disability for Cancer in Arkansas?

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Cancer and chemotherapy can make daily life a challenge. Cancer can impact a person’s ability to perform regular physical activities, which can keep them from being able to go to work to perform their job functions. Cancer patients who are unable to work have the option of using Social Security Disability Insurance to get the money they need to survive while they focus on recovery. To learn more about how you can qualify for disability benefits with cancer in Arkansas, continue reading for information about how to get disability for cancer in Arkansas and how the Fayetteville, AR disability lawyer Ken Kieklak can help.

How Cancer Can Keep You From Working

Cancer can severely impact a person’s ability to perform their daily work activities. Chemotherapy, which treats cancer, can have side effects that can be just as impactful as cancer itself. Cancer can make working a nearly impossible task in the following ways:

Fatigue

Cancer can cause extreme tiredness that cannot be managed by simply resting. Fatigue may be caused by internal bleeding that results from some cancers (such as colon cancer and stomach cancer). Chemotherapy and radiation therapy can also cause fatigue. A constant state of fatigue can make it difficult for people to go to work.

Unexpected Weight Loss

Cancer can cause people to lose their appetites, which can result in unexpected weight loss. Cancer treatment can result in mouth sores, thick saliva, nausea, and difficulty chewing and swallowing, which makes it more challenging to eat and maintain a proper weight. With weight loss comes malnutrition, which means that people with cancer often lack the strength to perform regular job duties.

Pain

Constant pain throughout the entire body is a side effect of some types of cancer. Performing simple tasks at work can make the pain much worse.

If you are enduring cancer and are unable to go to work, reach out to an experienced social security disability lawyer to make the disability application process easier. Get in touch with Ken Keiklak—we can handle the legal matters so you can focus on managing your condition and working towards an eventual recovery.

How the SSA Determines Qualifying for Disability Benefits for Cancer in Arkansas

People who apply for SSDI disability benefits must meet two main requirements. Firstly, the applicant must have worked for a sufficient number of years, and in many cases, they must have been in the workforce recently. Also, an applicant must make an income that is below a certain threshold. Applicants will not qualify to receive SSDI benefits if they generate more than $1,090 per month (this limit is different for blind applicants).

In addition to meeting program requirements, SSDI applicants have to show that their medical condition is severe enough to keep them from being able to go to work. The applicant will have to show that their condition causes significant limitations. Their condition must also be expected to either last for at least the next twelve months or result in death.

The Social Security Administration uses a grouping of criteria listed in what is called the Blue Book to determine whether a medical condition is severe enough to qualify for disability benefits in Arkansas. Applicants should note that they may still receive disability benefits if they do not meet the criteria set by the Social Security Administration. A medical-vocational allowance provides benefits for applicants who can show that their condition keeps them from being able to go to work.

Information about which cancers qualify for social security disability benefits can be found in Section 13.00 of the Blue Book. Many cancers are aggressive or hard to treat, which means that just a diagnosis is enough to qualify for benefits. The following cancers are likely to be eligible for social security benefits automatically: esophageal cancer, gallbladder cancer, lymphoma, brain and spinal tumors, thyroid cancer, sinus cancer, salivary cancer, pancreatic cancer, liver cancer, and breast cancer. Other types of cancer will need more medical examination to be approved for benefits.

If you would like to know more about whether your type of cancer meets the requirements set by the Social Security Administration, get in touch with an experienced social security disability lawyer as soon as possible. They will be able to explain how to meet the requirements and how they relate to your circumstances.

How Social Security Disability Benefits Can Be Terminated

Social security benefits can last as long as a condition keeps an individual from being able to work, which can be the entirety of an adult lifetime for some people. The Social Security Administration periodically tests whether beneficiaries can work by asking them to go back to work during a “trial work period.” If the benefit recipient shows that they can work during this period, their benefits will likely be terminated. If they are terminated, it is possible to get them reinstated with the help of a Fayetteville, AR termination of benefits lawyer. A lawyer can also help you if your application for disability benefits is denied in Arkansas.

Arkansas Social Security Disability Attorney Available to Help with Applications for Cancer Patients

Ken Kieklak has been available to provide legal assistance and representation to people throughout the State of Arkansas for nearly two decades. If you or someone you love is trying to get Social Security Disability Insurance benefits while they struggle to beat their cancer, get in touch with the Fayetteville, disability attorney Ken Kieklak, Attorney at Law today. You can call (479) 316-0438 to schedule a free consultation today.

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