How to Apply for Disability Benefits for Vision Loss at Work in Arkansas

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Disability benefits are a possible option for an individual that was injured in a severe work accident. For a person that sustained vision loss and could have difficulty performing the tasks of their job, disability benefits will help with medical bills and other expenses that may arise due to their injury. If you need the help of an experienced attorney to apply for disability benefits in Arkansas, you should consult with a Fayetteville, AR disability attorney as soon as possible.

Ken Kieklak, Attorney at Law, has worked on a wide range of disability benefits cases, and he would be pleased to help you fight for the benefits you deserve. You do not have to handle your disability benefits case alone. Contact Ken Kieklak, Attorney at Law, at (479) 316-0438 to schedule your free legal consultation. You may also contact the firm online to schedule your consultation.

Does Vision Loss Qualify for Disability Benefits in Arkansas?

There are a number of circumstances where a person could sustain a workplace injury in Arkansas that may result in a loss of vision. For example, if an employee works with dangerous chemicals, and one of these chemicals makes eye contact, this could cause vision loss. Note, however, that mild vision loss may not be enough to secure disability benefits for your injuries.

Do you qualify for disability benefits in Arkansas? The Social Security Administration uses a manual known as the “Blue Book” to gauge the injuries that may qualify for disability benefits. In the Blue Book is a list of conditions that the SSA acknowledges could support a disability benefits claim. However, it is not enough to simply claim that you have vision loss or another type of listed condition. Instead, the SSA will check the extent of the applicant’s injury.

To determine whether your vision loss is a condition that qualifies for disability benefits in Arkansas, you should look at the standards set in the Blue Book.

Loss of Central Acuity

According to the Blue Book published by the SSA, a loss of central acuity can qualify for disability benefits. This means that if you have a loss of central field vision and your vision is equal to or worse than 20/200, you could be eligible for disability benefits.

Contraction of Visual Field

The SSA may also examine whether an applicant has a shrinking field of vision. This will typically require the applicant to be examined by a doctor in order to determine the severity of their injury. If an applicant has a visual field that is greater than 20-30 degrees, this could disqualify them from receiving benefits.

Visual Impairment

The SSA defines visual impairment or a loss of visual efficiency as a disability that causes blurry vision or complete blindness. To determine whether an applicant for disability benefits can qualify under these standards, the SSA will look to whether the applicant’s vision is better than 20/200 when wearing contact lenses or glasses.

To learn more about how to apply for disability benefits in Arkansas for loss of vision, you should continue reading and contact an experienced Arkansas disability benefits attorney as soon as possible.

Documentation Needed to Apply for Disability Benefits for Vision Loss at Work

If you are experiencing a loss of vision due to a work injury, our firm can help you get started on an application for disability benefits. We understand that it can be difficult to manage a serious injury while applying for benefits, and we are here to guide you through this complex legal process.

To apply for disability benefits, you will need a large amount of documentation. As you might expect, you should be sure to have sensitive information like name, address, bank information, and social security number on hand. However, you should also be sure to secure the following information that will make it easier to file your claim.

Medical Records

When applying for SSDI or SSI, you should be sure to have your medical records on hand. The SSA will assign a disability examiner to check the extent of your injury and whether it should be treated as a disability.

Employment History

You should also have documentation regarding your work history. Specifically, you should have information about your salary for the current and previous year and a list of the last five employers you had. Additionally, if you were injured at the workplace and filed or planned to file a workers’ compensation claim, this should also be mentioned to the disability examiner.

Once you have all the relevant information needed to pursue your case, you should bring it to an experienced disability benefits lawyer. If you are missing information, we can help secure the files you need. Please do not wait a long period of time before pursuing your disability benefits. If you wait weeks or months after your disability has occurred, this may negatively affect your case.

Contact Our Experienced Arkansas SSDI Lawyer for Vision Loss at Work

If you or a family member was injured in at work and sustained vision loss, you should consult with an experienced Springdale, AR social security disability lawyer today. With over 20 years of experience, disability benefits lawyer Ken Kieklak would like to offer you his legal skills to pursue disability benefits for your eye injury. To schedule a free legal consultation to discuss your benefits case, contact Ken Kieklak, Attorney at Law, at (479) 316-0438. You may also use the online submission form to schedule your appointment.

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