Should You Go to the Hospital After a Car Accident in Arkansas?

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If you were in a car accident, you should always call 911 to report the accident to the police.  If someone is injured, you should request an ambulance as well.  But how do you know if you’re injured enough for an ambulance?  When an ambulance comes, should you go to the hospital?  Fayetteville car accident lawyer Ken Kieklak explains some things to consider when deciding whether to go to the hospital after an accident and how the law in Arkansas will affect your case if you do not seek medical attention.

Do I Need to Go to the Hospital After a Car Crash?

After a car accident, there are a few things you should always do.  First, you should call the police to report the accident.  The accident report will be helpful information later, and police can deal with the other driver if they are belligerent or intoxicated.  Second, you should get the other driver’s information – name, address, insurance info, license plate number, etc. – and take pictures of the accident.  You’ll need their info to make an insurance claim against them or to take them to court, and photos of the crash are extremely helpful in proving your case.  Third, you should get medical attention if you need it – but do you need to actually go to a hospital?

Most car accidents do not include severe injuries.  In fact, most accidents statistically have property damage only, and there is no need to go to the hospital for these kinds of accidents.  In those cases, an ambulance is usually unnecessary.  However, if you have visible injuries or feel any pain, you should at least get checked out by an EMT.

When an ambulance responds to the accident, you should have the EMTs check to see how you are.  Immediately after an accident, the stress of the event and the adrenaline in your system may prevent you from noticing injuries or feeling the pain associated with even severe injuries.  An EMT can assess your condition and treat minor wounds.  They can also let you know if they think you should go to the hospital for further treatment or evaluation.

If the EMTs or other first responders think you should go to the hospital, you should probably listen to their advice.  They have training and experience assessing peoples’ injuries and can help advise them on when they should seek additional medical care.

If you have visible wounds that look serious, you can tell you have a broken bone, or you have an injury that includes loss of feeling or sensation in any part of your body, definitely go to the hospital.  Moreover, if you are unconscious, you may be taken to the hospital whether you want to go or not.

Reasons to Go to the Hospital After a Car Accident

There are three major reasons you should go to the hospital after an accident if you have severe injuries.  Two of these reasons are based on legal concerns related to a potential car accident lawsuit or insurance claim for your injuries.  However, the first reason is possibly the most important.

The first reason to go to the hospital after receiving car accident injuries is to help you get better.  If you have severe injuries, they may not heal properly if you wait to seek medical treatment.  If you have injuries that are not immediately obvious, the injuries and side effects could get worse or even lead to death.  Brain trauma and internal injuries may not be obvious, especially if adrenaline is masking the pain and other symptoms.  Going to a hospital can get you on the path to recovery quickly and may even be able to reverse the effects of potentially life-threatening injuries if you are treated quickly.  Do not worry about the cost of treatment or whether it is worth it – just worry about getting the help you need.

Second, it is important to go to the hospital if you will be making an insurance claim or filing a lawsuit because a hospital visit builds a record of your injuries.  The doctors and nurses that treat your injuries will add the injuries to your medical records with information on what injuries they treated, when they treated them, and how much these injuries cost.  Having this documentary evidence is vital in a lawsuit or other claim because the evidence helps you show the court what your injuries were, how severe they were, and how much the medical care cost you, which can help you prove damages.

Lastly, going to the hospital for treatment shows that the injuries you suffered were severe and came from the crash.  If you do not go to the hospital then try to sue for injuries, the defendant will likely argue that the injuries could not have been that serious if you did not go to the hospital.  If you waited a day or longer to seek medical care, the defendant could also argue that you received the injury after the accident and tried to pass it off as coming from the crash.  Going to the hospital right after the crash helps you prove the injury was indeed severe and that it did indeed come from the crash.

Call Our Fayetteville, AR Car Accident Injury Lawyer Today

If you or a loved one was injured in a car crash in Arkansas, it is vital to get the medical attention you deserve.  If your medical care leads to expensive medical bills and other damages, filing a lawsuit for your injuries may be the best way to get the compensation you need.  Call Ken Kieklak, Attorney at Law, to discuss your injury case and set up a free legal consultation.  Our Fayetteville personal injury lawyer may be able to take your case and file a lawsuit on your behalf to get you the compensation you need.  Call us today at (479) 439-1843.

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